Holiday Market

Come check us out at the Holiday Market at the Will-Mar Neighborhood Center, 953 Jennifer St. in Madison.  We will be there from 4pm-7pm and will have a variety of  Gift Boxes available featuring our Native made products!

New Location for Mobile Farmers Market and Updates

Mobile Farmers Market is moving!  We are transitioning to a more cooperative model that will be more beneficial to everyone involved. This involves moving from our present retail location to our new warehouse location: 2890 Terra Court Unit 32, Sun Prairie, WI 53590.

We will be focusing more on distribution, bulk orders to restaurants/chefs, and vending opportunities. Another focus of ours is on more online sales and to continue our monthly TSA (Tribally Supported Agriculture). We will have the space to make larger purchases and hope that producers will work with us to offer competitive wholesale pricing in order to continue providing products to our Native communities and to continue outreach within non-Native communities. After the holidays, we will be able to order in larger quantities and to handle more frequent shipping.   We will maintain our marketing and outreach efforts in order to continue garnering support for our Native producers. Locally, you will find our products at Supercharge! Foods with other retail locations coming soon.

Please contact Dan Cornelius, 608-280-1267 or Liz Kiesling, 608-444-8156 with questions.

Processing parched corn into Hominy

By Paul DeMain

Many workshops offered during the recent Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Food Summits of 2016 at Red Lake, Minnesota, Madison and Camp Jijak in 2016 and 2017 have involved the gathering/harvesting of resources and their processing of some of these foods into Value Added Products (VAP) for storage, future, or a diversity of uses in their new condition. Some products gathered are always used on site in order to facilitate sharing of traditional food preparations and ancient or contemporary recipes.

Amongst those products include what the Ojibwe called Mandamin (The Great Seed) or corn and for which there has been some 350+ varieties amongst tribes identified so far. May varieties of Indian corn have been lost — to history, maybe Mansanto, or caches that are yet to be found. A good example might be the White Flint Corn described as growing on Madeline Island, in Lake Superior — also know as the former capital of the Ojibwe Nation, a variety of corn that is described as growing there in the 1700s. While it is possible, and probably likely, that the White Flint grown there is related to other northern Wisconsin, Great Lakes or Island flints that are well known, (Like Bear Island White Flint) and could be connected genetically to the Madeline Island gardens, to date there has not been a Madeline Island White Flint Corn seed, or seed cache identified in seed repositories, museums or private collections.

Jijak_#1George_Cooking_HominyLac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe elder George Martin, assisted by Buddy Raphael (not shown) discuss the boiling process for making parched corn into hominy. Raphael says he likes to let his corn dry for over a year before using it for cooking and other needs.

After the parched corn is boiled in an alkaline solution for a lengthy time period, in this case hardwood ashes and for some tribes maple ashes in particular rather then lye, lime or baking soda, the corn is then transported to a screen for further cleaning. By now, a thin outer shell and little seed connection nub should come off easily from the corn kernel when rubbed between two fingers. The boiling in ash, or lime process changes the chemistry of the corn, contributes calcium, potassium and trace minerals to the corn and makes it more nutritious while at the same time loosening a thin outer shell casing from the kernel.

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The cooked corn is transported to a screen for further cleaning, drying and discussions with Camp Jijak participants.

The Oneida’s of Wisconsin hand pick and dehydrate much of their white flint corn and then prepare it in this similar manner and in some cases they will boil it again for grinding and making corn meal while adding kidney beans and making small round loafs to refrigerate for storage. Hopi people of the Southwest used ground blue corn mixed with small amounts of willow wood ash to prepare piki, a thin, crepe-like, blue bread. A porridge made from hominy in the south is called grits. Many tribes had their own technique for preparing their corn for future storage and seed keepers have identified over 300 varieties of corn grown historically in Indian Country with some sweet varieties not suitable for making hominy.

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Below: Buddy Raphael provides some traditional teachings and advice for making corn hominy.

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For more information on programs provided by the Intertribal Agriculture Council (IAC) you can go on the net here: IAC

Other Youtube videos from Camp Jijak.

Seed Keepers & Rowen White

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Photos by D.Kakkak

One of the world’s wonderful speakers about the nature of, treatment, care and planting of seeds is Akwesasne Mohawk seed keeper Rowen White. Through several workshops in the Great Lakes and at the Gun Lake Pottawatomi tribes’ Camp Jijak in 2016 and 2017 White has led discussions on the cultural treatment, history and love of seeds that Indigenous people have.

White also brought some of her wonderful and extensive seed collections to assist in teaching people about the role of labeling, organizing, acclimating and caring for seeds for storage and planting. At just about any event that Rowen attends, there will be an abundance of seeds to look at, and in many cases share or exchange.

According to Rowen White “once you step on the seed keepers path, you will have more seeds then you know what to do with, because seeds, they are always multiplying exponentially.”

Many of the conferences, sponsored in part by the Inter-Tribal Agricultural Council (IAC) are meant to help bring and grow opportunities for American Indian farmers, growers, forage and gatherers and enhance the ability of Indigenous communities to become food self-sufficient once again.

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Sapping, Syrup and Sugar – Jijak 2017

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Maple sugar used to be packaged in 65lb mukuks, or birchbark baskets by the Ojibwe Anishinabeg of the Great Lakes. 65lbs of maple = about 8.1 gallons of syrup. You can learn a lot more about historic and contemporary sapping, making maple syrup or sugar and the kinds of trees you can tap at this years Great Lakes Food Summit coming up April 19-23rd, 2017 in Hopkins, Michigan.

Live Broadcast – Food Sovereignty Symposium & Festival

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The Food Sovereignty Symposium and Festival is just about ready, and meal tickets are going fast for the March 10-12 event on the University of Wisconsin campus and surrounding sites in Madison, Wisconsin. The symposium component of the event is focusing on Indigenous and broader topics of food sovereignty that impact how communities and individuals control and manage their food systems, and the festival component is a celebration of Indigenous, local, and regional foods hosted by several very famous and mouth watering Indigenous chefs — preparing our daily meals.

CLICK MORE LINK FOR SCHEDULE and Meal Tickets: https://food-sovereignty.com/

LIVE BROADCASTING BY IndianCountryTV.com :

LIVE Friday March 10th:
1-4:30pm

#1 Rowen White – Seed Sovereignty, Janie Hipp with the Tribal Food Code Project:

#2. Dan Cornelius, Jessie Conaway, Reynaldo Morales and Martin Reinhardt on Climate Change, Treaty Rights and Natural Resources:

#3. Elizabeth Hoover, Brian Yazzie and Richard Monette reflecting on Standing Rock.

LIVE: Saturday March 11th:

#1. 9:15-10am – Rowen White on Seeds, Sovereignty and Building for the Future.

#2. 10:00-12am – Taste of Tribes Brunch – and All Star Native chef team.

#3. 12:00am – Keynote with Elizabeth Hoover on Food Sovereignty Today.

WATCH IT HERE AT IndianCountryTV

Don’t forget to join us at the 2017 Great Lakes Intertribal food Summit at Camp Jijak April 20-23, 2017.

Upcoming Events

The Mobile Farmers Market’s upcoming schedule includes:

  • MOSES Organic Farming Conference – Feb. 24-25 • LaCrosse, WI
  • Indigenous Farming Conference – March 3-6 • White Earth, MN
  • Food Sovereignty Symposium & Festival – March 10-12 • Madison, WI
  • Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit – April 19-12 • Gun Lake Pottawatomi, MI

Here’s more information on the Food Sovereignty Symposium & Festival and Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit that are hosted by the Intertribal Agriculture Council.

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Native Market and Gallery: Weekend Hours and Sakari Botanicals

We are excited to announce new Native Market & Gallery weekend hours, Saturday’s from 11 to 4pm!

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Native Market & Gallery • 1732 Fordem Avenue, Madison, WI

Come visit us and check out some of our new products from Sakari Botanicals, a Native American female owned business out of Bend, Oregon. All herbs are wild crafted and/or organically grown at their nursery. Pick up some bath salts, healing salves, lip balms or infused medicinal oils for yourself or as a gift.

 

Holiday Shopping at the Native Market and Gallery

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Check out some of our new products at the market!

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A great variety of native harvested wild rice

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sacred medicines to involve in your holiday traditions

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Dentalium shell earrings made by Kristin Kingman a local native artist

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More great gift ideas

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New Mexico inlay earrings

Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit

The Intertribal Agriculture Council and the Gun Lake Pottawatomi Tribe are hosting the Spring 2017 Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit from April 19-23 at Gun Lake’s Jijak facility.  Please visit the event website if you want to share feedback on what you’d like to see as part of the event or if you want to get involved.

Chef applications are currently being accepted, with those received by November 30th receiving priority.

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